WSARC TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS

Digital Mobile Radio (DMR) is a limited open digital mobile radio standard defined in the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) Standard TS 102 361 parts 1–4 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_mobile_radio).  The West Seattle Amateur Radio Club is in the process of  establishing a Digital Mobile Radio Repeater in West Seattle.  For more information https://w7aw.org/education/technology/DMR/.

 

HamWAN is a non-profit organization (501c3) developing best practices for high speed amateur radio data networks. HamWAN also runs the Puget Sound Data Ring, which is a real-world network implementation of the proposed designs.  WSARC  uses HamWAN’s Puget Sound Data Ring for internet connectivity to the WSARC repeater sites.  Several members also have HamWAN client stations at their homes.

So far, HamWAN networks have been used for things like low-latency repeater linking, real-time video feeds from distant locations, serving APRS I-gates, providing redundant internet access to emergency operations centers, and more. Any licensed radio amateur in the service area can connect their shack directly to the network with just a small investment in equipment and no recurring cost. Since many traditional uses for Internet at home are not compatible with Part 97 rules, this won’t replace your home Internet connection.

The HamWAN Puget Sound Data Ring has cells deployed at numerous wide-coverage sites. These sites are interconnected with 5 GHz modems and routed with OSPF, forming a redundant high-speed backbone to route traffic between sites and to the internet.  For more information  http://hamwan.org/.

 

Mesh Networking /  Mesh Net / Mesh is a local network topology in which the infrastructure nodes (i.e. bridges, switches, and other infrastructure devices) connect directly, dynamically and non-hierarchically to as many other nodes as possible and cooperate with one another to efficiently route data from/to clients. This lack of dependency on one node allows for every node to participate in the relay of information. Mesh networks dynamically self-organize and self-configure, which can reduce installation overhead. The ability to self-configure enables dynamic distribution of workloads, particularly in the event a few nodes should fail.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesh_networking)

WSARC members are currently implementing “Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network (AREDN)” Mesh sites in West Seattle.  For more information https://www.arednmesh.org/aredn-advantage.